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An unreleased track from a live performance of Woody Shaw's quintet featuring Bobby Hutcherson in Tokyo, Japan, 1981.  Browse the Woody Shaw Shop

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Note by Woody Shaw III: Here is an excerpt from a selection of reviews written by late New York Times music critic Robert Palmer in December of 1977, which included new album releases as eclectic and varied as the works of Ludwvig Van Beethoven - performed by the London Symphony Orchestra - and the latest recording to date by Woody Shaw entitled Love Dance (featuring Joe Bonner, pn; Billy Harper, ts; Steve Turre, tb; Cecil McBee, bs; Victor Lewis, ds). The title of the article could be taken as more than just a mere reference to the primary subjects of review, but...

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Browse the Woody Shaw Shop Robert IannapolloCadence MagazineIndependent Journal of Creative Improvised Music(Oct 2012): pp 68-69. Woody Shaw's neo hard- bop albums for Columbia [Records] in the late 1970s were highly regarded and paved the way for Wynton Marsalis and his young lion cohorts' hard bop revival. But Shaw also had a sense of adventure. Early on he recorded with Eric Dolphy and Archie Shepp. As late as the mid-1970s he recorded an album with Muhal Richard Abrams and Anthony Braxton in the lineup. He even played on Pharaoh Sanders' Deaf Dumb Blind album. The strength of Shaw's later albums derives...

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Browse the Woody Shaw Webstore by Robert Palmer. March 30, 1977. In the modern jazz mainstream, an area bounded chronologically by the hard bop of the early 1950's and the Modal playing popularized by Miles Davis and John Coltrane during the early 1960's, Woody Shaw is the reigning trumpet king. Freddie Hubbard is stiff competition, but Mr. Hubbard is mining the disco vein, leaving Mr. Shaw to explore a purer vision.  During the last few years Mr. Shaw has worked mostly with a quintet that sounds like an updated version of the Jazz Messengers, but recently he has been performing odd engagements...

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Here are some interview clips of Woody Shaw briefly discussing the influence of Eric Dolphy on the development of his musical thought process and approach to playing the trumpet. Also included is a clip of 18 year-old Woody Shaw on his recorded debut on Dolphy's "Conversations" album (with Bobby Hutcherson, Richard Davis, Clifford Jordan, and J.C. Moses) in 1963. 

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